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Does Bucked Up Pre-Workout Have Creatine? A Short Guide

(Last Updated On: October 11, 2023)

Creatine is a chemical compound found inside your body and can also be taken in the form of a supplement to improve your exercise performance and strength. 

Bucked Up is a popular pre-workout formula that people have been using to increase energy levels and enhance their workout performance. Thus, the inclusion of Creatine in a pre-workout can add up to significant strength benefits. 

But, does Bucked Up have creatine? If you are not aware of the answer, stick along with us and you will know everything right away.

Besides taking down on, if Bucked Up pre-workout has creatine, we also looked if they sell a Creatine product and if you should be buying them. 

Thus, this article will be your complete go-to guide for Bucked Up and Creatine discussion. 

What is Creatine?

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The official definition of Creatine is a chemical compound present within your body whose primary function is to provide energy to muscles while promoting brain health.

Creatine is a type of amino acid and its content is usually higher in food with high protein. 

The main source of creatine in your body is food while some proportion of it is also made by your body organs like kidneys, liver, and pancreas.

Creatine supplements are often taken by bodybuilders, weight-lifters, athletes, and sports persons to help them achieve their goals in exercise and sports. 

These supplements can help increase or enhance their performance, stamina, and strength while helping you build muscles at the same time.

So, do Bucked Up pre-workouts contain creatine in them? This can be found once you navigate through their ingredient label. 

Does Bucked Up Have Creatine?

First things first, let’s look at what ingredients the Bucked Up pre-workout contains.

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Note: We have a complete ingredient breakdown with benefits right below which you do not want to miss. 

Clearly, like it or not Bucked Up doesn’t have creatine in their pre-workout supplement. However, this isn’t necessarily bad news. 

When your pre-workout doesn’t create creatine, you can always choose to mix both of these or take creatine alongside your pre-workout to experience the best results. 

Though the addition of creatine can have been a lot better and the answer might sound a bit counterintuitive, without creatine too Bucked Up can give you high performance and stamina benefits.

Creatine is often seen as a filler ingredient like BCAAs. Also, there’s a study suggesting that creatine after workout or post-workout is good for reducing fat-free muscle mass in comparison to pre-workout. 

Thus, without creatine, Bucked-Up pre-workout can work and have good energy, endurance, focus, and pump needed to begin your workout session. 

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What’s Inside Bucked Up Pre-Workout?

The Bucked Up brand offers pre-workout supplements that are keto and paleo-friendly. Their supplements are free of sugar and calories, and they are GMP-certified. 

In addition to its classic pre-workout options, the company also offers other pre-workout products such as BLACK, WOKE AF, and Stim-Free. Their classic formula is the foundation for other formulations but with slight modifications like including Humic and Fulvic acids.

Bucked Up WOKE AF consists of two stimulants, synephrine HCl and dendrobium, that may have adverse effects. On the other hand, Bucked Up Stim-Free Pre-Workout does not have stimulants, but the original formula’s elements that enhance performance are still present.

This pre-workout supplement is available in 22 different flavors and is priced reasonably at $49.95. 

Each flavor contains the same active ingredients, which include Beta-alanine, Citrulline malate, Caffeine Anhydrous, ActiGin® (Panax notoginseng, Rosa roxburghii), AstraGin® (Astragalus, Panax notoginseng), Deer antler velvet extract, Himalayan rock salt, Alpha GPC, and Taurine.

All flavors contain caffeine-anhydrous which improves your mental alertness and reduces fatigue. and the Beta-alanine present in it buffers lactic acid buildup for improved performance and endurance (1).

This pre-workout also features Citrulline malate and Taurine both of which have benefits for athletic performance and taurine has antioxidant properties and can potentially improve athletic performance for athletes (2,3).

Secondly, Citrulline malate boosts ATP production, blood flow, and endurance. According to a meta-study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology, consuming Citrulline malate before exercise can reduce muscular soreness by 40% after 24 hours.

The Bucked Up pre-workout supplement includes alpha-GPC, an ingredient that can enhance cognitive function. This can help you stay mentally focused and engaged during your workouts.

Deer antler velvet extract may improve your aerobic performance and muscle strength, but there’s not much scientific evidence to back it up. Do your research and talk to a healthcare professional before trying or adding any new supplements.

Himalayan rock salt has been found to contain important minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium, which are crucial for maintaining strong muscles and keeping the body hydrated.

It’s worth noting that there is currently limited scientific evidence suggesting the effectiveness of the active ingredients in this pre-workout supplement. More research is needed for both AstraGin® and ActiGin®. 

These ingredients are promoted to enhance athletic performance and assist with nutrient absorption. ActiGin, which is made from natural ingredients, is thought to improve endurance and possess strong antioxidant properties.

Just keep in mind that this product does contain natural & artificial flavors and sucralose which some people prefer to avoid these two ingredients. 

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Is Creatine Bad For You? 

Creatine is the most widely available supplement for improving your sports performance. Although there is scientific evidence supporting its use, there are still individuals who avoid taking creatine due to health concerns.

Many studies support its safety and efficacy, despite reports that it causes weight gain, cramping, and problems with the liver, kidneys, or stomach. Depending on who you ask here the suggested side effects of creatine include:

  • Kidney stones and damage.
  • Bloating and digestive concerns.
  • Liver damage and weight gain.
  • Muscle cramps and compartment syndrome.
  • Rhabdomyolysis and dehydration.

Additionally, any creatine products may be a concern for you if you take certain medications, such as those that affect blood sugar. Also, research has shown creatine is safe for weight gain and cramping, with no harm to the liver, kidneys, or stomach.

Contrary to popular misconception, taking creatine does not make you more likely to get cramps or become dehydrated (11,12,13,14,).

It is important to note that weight gain resulting from creatine use is not caused by the accumulation of fat, but rather by the increased water content in the muscles (1,2,3,4,5).

Studies have repeatedly shown that Creatine has a strong safety profile and there is no evidence to suggest that it contributes to harmful conditions like compartment syndrome or rhabdomyolysis (6,7,8,9,10).

Finally, it should be noted that some individuals make assertions regarding the safety and side effects of creatine that are not backed by research.

Does Bucked Up Sell Creatine?

It is true that Bucked Up sells Creatine Monohydrate products. People who want to build muscle and enhance performance, stamina, and recovery time can order Creatine Monohydrate directly from the company’s product page or through popular online retailers such as GNC, Walmart, Amazon, and Vitamin Shoppe.

In addition to its “Creatine Monohydrate” product, the company also offers Bucked Up Six Point Creatine. 

This product contains six different types of creatine, each with unique benefits and rates of release. By using this product, you can enhance your muscle growth, hasten your recovery time, and increase your strength and power output.

The company claims that its creatine monohydrate supplement is clinically dosed, tested, and graded. 

So, individuals who rely on supplements such as Creatine Monohydrate can benefit from using Bucked Up’s two creatine products as a helpful addition to their training routine. 

These products can aid in increasing muscle mass, enhancing endurance, and improving overall performance.

Read Next: Does Bloom Greens really work? Read to find out.

Is Bucked Up Good For You?

Moving up to our final discussion, so does the Bucked Up pre-workout have creatine? No, it doesn’t include any creatine in it but bucked upsells their Creatine supplement that you can use to fulfill your creatine requirements.

However, it is not necessary for a pre-workout supplement to contain creatine. 

The Bucked Up pre-workout already has sufficient ingredients that can promote higher energy levels and enhance your strength and fatigue timing. 

Also, there’s no harm in using a Creatine supplement alongside Bucked Up. So, you can choose a creatine supplement of your choice whether it’s Bucked Up Creatine or any other. 

Creatine supplement not only improves your strength and muscle mass but is also helpful in improving brain function. 

Thus, now you know everything that you should know about “Does Bucked Up have creatine?”. Time for you to let us know which pre-workout is your fav and if you are also taking creatine together.

Refrences

  1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23919405/
  2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20479615/
  3. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1186/1550-2783-7-5
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8571142/pdf/421_2021_Article_4774.pdf
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8152067/pdf/12970_2021_Article_438.pdf
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6073798/pdf/nutrients-10-00921.pdf
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8571142/
  8. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14669926/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9475647
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12945830
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7739317/
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7910963/
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996960/
  14. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27306768/
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7871530/
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12701814
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445756
  18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11445756
  19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12401856
  20. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16619092/
  21. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18652082
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18652082
  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7871530/
  24. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7871530/
  25. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creatine/

About the Author

Purushottam is the founder and content writer at Health On Planet, a place where regular health enthusiasts visit to get honest reviews about the supplement. He has been reviewing popular dietary supplements with his years of expertise in the wellness industry. You can always trust his expertise on supplements to help you make informed choices.

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